Sprygg - Indpiration

Inspiration.

artists, technologists and communities in Acts of Genius

Take back your city with paint
When Edi Rama became mayor of Tirana, Albania, the city was decrepit, dispirited and broke. Corruption was endemic and crime rampant. With a simple coat of paint, Rama lifted the city's spirits and sense of hope, kicking off urban regeneration.
ART
The simple act of applying paint kicked off a major restoration effort in the city including implementing a green tax, planting trees and removing concrete from riverbanks. 
Technology
An artist by training, Edi believed in the power of color to uplift. He began by painting one building, transforming it from a Soviet grey to a vibrant orange. '[T]his use of colors was not just an artistic act. Rather, it was a form of political action,' he said in a TED Talk.
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Paint the night with light
Austria’s Omai creates interactive art experiences around the world.
ART
Tagtool, a unique instrument that allows artists to paint and animate live on buildings with projected light.
Technology
Omai developed their unique live-animation app Tagtool as artists first – they needed the tool to make the art they envisioned. Now available to the public as an iPad app, Tagtool democratises the experience of bringing art to the streets.
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Step into life in London 2050
What will life in London be like in 2050, as rising temperatures and food shortages begin fuelling social unrest? Futures design studio Superflux's installation walks audiences through an apartment of the future. 
ART
Visit a typical middle-class apartment inhabited by a young family. Familiarity gives way to unease as we explore the shelves filled with recipe books on how to eat insects, jars of foraged produce and seeds and a newspaper detailing failing crops on the table. Further within, the living room is filled with shelves full of plants, mealworms, mushrooms, tubes and fans – an indoor farm.
Technology
The scenario is fictional, but the food-growing technology in the apartment is real. The industrial shelves full of live plants are being fed with LEDs and fogponics – controlled by Arduino microcomputers that tell sensors when to mist the plants’roots with nutrient-infused water.
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People-powered scientific research
From classifying animals in the Serengeti to discovering new exoplanets using the Kepler space telescope, Zooniverse is the world’s largest and most popular platform for people-powered science. The goal is to enable research that would not otherwise be possible or practical.
ART
The major challenge of 21st-century research is processing the flood of data being gathered. AI can help, but in many fields, the human eye's capacity for subtle pattern recognition — and our capacity for surprise — makes us better than computers at sorting data. 
Technology
Zooniverse’s platform lets scientists load data — usually images, but sometimes videos or sound — online and allows the public to carry out necessary research tasks such as identifying planets, animals, cells and so on. This frees up scientists to focus on data analysis. 
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Grayson's Art Club
For those who don’t know, Grayson Perry is a celebrated artist living and working in North London. He was first recognised for his exquisite ceramic works and his female alter-ego, Claire. He was awarded the Turner Prize in 2003, is an obsessive mountain-biker and thoroughly lovely person.
ART
Idea: help people through the hardships of the COVID lockdown by connecting them through a common interest in art and the ubiquity of technology. The Art Club is founded on the belief that art 'can help us explore our creativity, inspire and console us…and tell us something about who we really are.' There is also the principle that anyone can create art. We just have to relax and become free of the fear of expressing ourselves.
Technology
Grayson’s Art Club ran as a series of six TV programmes with each episode exploring an aspect of Britain and the lockdown experience. At the outset Grayson asked the public to create pieces of work on a set of given subjects and upload them to a website. The artworks are discussed over a Zoom chat and selected pieces are curated for an exhibition that will provide a permanent record of the Isolation. Grayson himself creates a series of works on COVID Britain and he invites contributions from various arty celebrities and other ‘real’ artists.
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Phacktory: Starling’s One
Phacktory is a lab that supports high-risk, audacious projects that could fail. One of its inaugural projects, Starling's One, created a kinetic and dynamic architecture that adapts to human interaction.
ART
An interactive public art installation combining light and movement into an amazing, glowing canopy over Ottawa's ByWard Market in the fall of 2016.
Technology
Community members gathered to demonstrate this dynamic architecture in real time by pulling on the guy-wires that supported the canopy, morphing it into various amazing shapes.
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Cryptoartathon
Through the wormhole of the metaverse.
ART
When annual Berlin street festival 48h Neukolln had to be cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it quickly moved all its events online. One of these events, Lenara Verle’s Cryptoartathon, an introduction to cryptoart in the VR world, was to have taken place at a bar called Das Kapital in Neukolln.
Technology
Lenara set up a virtual event in VR space Cryptovoxels (like Minecraft, but dedicated to art galleries) complete with an exhibition, sculptures, DJ and big screen for a livecast of the event. From inside the empty bar, Lenara and her partner artist Ilan Katin live-streamed lectures, artist talks and Cryptovoxels gallery tours to the world via Twitch – which in turn was broadcast inside Cryptovoxels on the big screen. Virtual audiences could follow along on one or both platforms.
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GlobalXplorer°
GlobalXplorer° uses the power of the crowd to help archeologists analyze the incredible wealth of satellite images to identify and protect crucial sites that are otherwise impossible to see. 
ART
The world's archeological sites are the repositories of our collective cultural heritage. These artworks, structures and daily objects left by our ancestors reveal the trajectory of human development. Yet they are vulnerable to looting, war and exposure to the elements. Archeologists are in a constant race against time to identify and preserve this precious resource. 
Technology
Satellite images of Earth make it possible to search the planet for unidentified archeological sites as well as monitor where looting is taking place. The images are loaded onto the GlobalXplorerº portal as individual 300-by-300–meter tiles, where citizen scientists log in to positively identify what appear to be sites of archaeological interest. Archeologists then use the positively identified tiles to prioritise which sites they'll travel to to confirm and document, offering the data to governments to help safeguard their archeological sites. 
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where artists, technologists and communities gather to inspire Acts of Genius

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Sprygg is a Gildedsplinters project
© 2020 Gildedsplinters All rights reserved

where artists, technologists and communities gather to inspire Acts of Genius
where artists, technologists and communities gather to inspire Acts of Genius

Sprygg is a Gildedsplinters project
© 2020 Gildedsplinters All rights reserved